Alumni Spotlight

Spotlight on Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen '15

Tell us a little about your life in choirs…

My first involvement in music came through choirs, and it has always been something I've deeply enjoyed. My parents had me join the Brooklyn Youth Chorus when I was in 7th grade, and it was there that I first learned to read music. Then, I went to high school at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School in New York, where I sang in choirs for all 4 years (and had some extraordinary experiences under the head choral conductor, Jana Ballard.) Then, of course, I joined the Glee Club (and later the chamber choir) at Princeton, and experienced years of learning under Gabriel's guidance! 

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

Gabriel Crouch is definitely among my greatest influences - his mentorship and guidance in times of great pressure has been so important to me. 

Beyond Gabriel, I find that I am deeply influenced and inspired by all of the teachers and coaches I've worked with. My favorite thing about pursuing a career as a classical singer is that we are always students, and I am so grateful to the amazing people I get to work with, from whom I learn so much!

Your most memorable concert experience?

With the Glee Club, it was definitely singing the Bach Magnificat at Bach's Church, the Thomaskirche, with the Leipzig Barockorchester. Truly unforgettable!

Beyond Glee Club, it has to be singing to a sold out San Francisco Opera House this summer - I had never before sung in a house that size, and it was frightening, exhilarating, and above all, amazing!

Your favorite music to play and listen to?

My favorite music to sing is Handel. Something about his writing just clicks for me - it feels so right!

As far as listening, I'm always listening to my favorite classical singers - Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, Janet Baker, David Daniels, along with whoever happens to be the subject of my obsession of the month - right now, I'm listening to a ton of the great Anne Sofie von Otter.

Beyond classical music, I have pretty eclectic tastes - the artists I always return to include Andrew Bird, Bruce Springsteen, Joan Baez, Bon Iver, Crosby Stills Nash Young, among many others...

What are you working on at the moment?

Today, I'm learning a few new Handel arias (including an unknown gem from his opera Imeneo that I'm particularly excited about!), and then I'm also in the process of working on some arias and ensembles (by Handel, Carissimi, Cesti, and others) for upcoming concerts.

Where would I like to be in 10 years’ time?

I'd love to be singing great music with wonderful musicians who are fantastic friends and colleagues. I'm so lucky to have experienced that this summer in San Francisco, and I can only dream of doing so in 10 years!

What do you enjoy doing most?

Outside of music, I love running (running my first marathon - the NYC Marathon - in a few weeks!), cooking, and reading about/discussing politics (even if it has gotten truly horrifying this election cycle...)

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Any favorite Glee Club memories?

I learned so much in the Glee Club, especially about stylistic baroque performance and about what it means to be a good musical colleague. My favorite glee club memories are definitely the tours - Paris my freshman year, and Germany and the Czech Republic my junior year. It was amazing to see how our singing as an ensemble changed as we got closer to each other over the course of these trips. We are so lucky to have had these experiences!

Spotlight on Kristin Moore '76

Kristin Moore, who joined us again this year for our annual singing of Spem in Alium, is a member of the great class of 1976. She was with the Glee Club for its Europe tour in 1974 and cherishes wonderful memories from her experiences. Although not a career musician, she remains highly committed to organized choral work, as the following will reveal…

Tell us a little about your life in choirs…

My career was in Information Technology, but I have almost always sung in a chorus or choir from the time I had my first solo back in third grade.  I had a mentor, G. Alex Kevan, from that third grade solo all through high school, who definitely influenced my sense of musicality and joy in music.  After Princeton (Freshman Glee Club, one year in the Glee Club, and Katzenjammers), I lived in NYC and sang with the New York Choral Society, performing in Carnegie Hall.  When I went back to grad school at The University of Texas, I talked my way into the Summer Choral Union without an audition to sing the Chichester Psalms - now one of my favorite pieces. After receiving my MBA, I moved to Dallas where I first sang with a church choir and then joined the Dallas Symphony Chorus for five years.  At that point, I determined I preferred a smaller choir and joined the Aria Chamber Chorus.   The peril of a smaller chorus is that finances can be a struggle, and after several years and some director changes, Aria folded.  I then joined my current chorale, Arts District Chorale (ADC).  In addition to singing with ADC, I’m helping behind the scenes with various IT tasks.

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

As I mentioned above, the person who had the strongest influence on my love of music was G. Alex Kevan.  Other wonderful directors I’ve sung for include Constantina Tsolainou (director of the Arts District Chorale), Micheal Cervantes [really spelled Micheal - not a typo] (director of Aria Chamber Chorus), Michael Shake (my church choir director) and Jim Maase (a previous church choir director).  And I have to give a shout-out to one of the moms in one of my early school carpools.  She was driving us home one day.  We were singing in the car, and she basically explained harmony to me in a very simple way (since I was young).  I’ve been a happy alto ever since!

Your most memorable concert experience?

That’s hard to choose.  Four come to mind — two I sang in and two I didn’t.  First on my list would be the concert that Arts District Chorale did in May 2015.  It was the North Texas premiere of “Annelies”, music by James Whitbourn, libretto by Melanie Challenger and coincided with the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.  It was so special to perform this amazing piece with the cast of the 2014 Grammy Award-nominated album with soprano Arianna Zukerman and the Lincoln Trio with Bharat Chandra on the clarinet.  Such a moving piece!  I’d love to do it again.  Second would be the all-Ola Gjeilo concert that Arts District just did this spring.  The music continues to run through my mind and ear.  The two that I didn’t sing in:  the first was on the Princeton Glee Club trip to Europe in 1974 when we joined with Westminster Choir College to sing the Mozart Requiem at the Spoleto Music Festival; I had come down with bronchitis after our stay in Venice and couldn’t sing.  So I got to sit and listen up in one of the balconies.  (Thinking of the Europe trip reminds me that the service we participated in in the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris was incredibly special to me.)  The second concert that I didn’t sing in was one my husband sang in.  He was a member of the University of Michigan Men’s Glee Club, and we attended their 150th Anniversary weekend a few years ago with members of so many different classes.  I was brought to tears just hearing them rehearse before the concert — so beautiful!

Your favorite music to play and listen to?

I don’t play an instrument (despite five years of piano lessons), so the only music I play is recorded music.  :)  I love listening to choral music, especially a cappella.  I really enjoy the Minnesota Public Radio Choral Stream on the web. And as mentioned before, I really enjoy the music of Ola Gjeilo.

What are you working on at the moment?

Both church choir and Aria Chamber Chorus are on summer recess, so I’m not really working on anything musically.  I am working on the behind the scenes stuff for ADC, including website updates and researching donor CRM software

Where would I like to be in 10 years’ time?

Well, I’m already happily retired (just attended my 40th Reunion).  So I want to be healthy, both mentally and physically, still able to sing somewhere, and ideally living someplace where I can see the water!

What do you enjoy doing most?

I have to say I still enjoy singing the most, especially with a small choir of talented singers.  Other hobbies that I enjoy are genealogy (a giant puzzle!) and reading; I’m never without a book.

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Any favorite Glee Club memories?

Glee Club was the first time, I think, that I sang in a foreign language.  It was also the first time I sang with an orchestra.  And, thinking back, I think it might have also been the first time I sang a cappella.  Which brings me to my favorite memory — the Europe tour in 1974.  That’s not a single memory, but a whole slideshow of memories.  We had 50 people in a 51 seat bus for six weeks.  Our principal piece of music was the Missa Pange Lingua by Josquin des Pres; I’m listening to it now as I type this.  We performed it as a whole piece (Chartres Cathedral), but also as part of a church service (Notre Dame in Paris, in Vienna, and at St. Mark’s in Venice, among others).  The places that we were privileged to sing were just incredible, and it was truly a privilege to sing there.  It wasn’t just the music either; it was the people on the tour, the folks that are now friends for life.  It all comes down to people — as friends and as fellow musicians. (And I have to say — the annual Spem in Alium at Reunions ranks right up there in the list of favorites! Love singing with Gabriel!)

Alumni Spotlight on Tanyaradzwa Tawengwa '14

What inspired you to pursue a career in music?

I really don't see it that way. I believe that music is what I'm made to do and that my being in the music career was inevitable. But I will say that I enjoy the impact a song can have on someone. That's what keeps me singing everyday. 

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

My great-grandfather was a choral conductor and both sides of my family have been singing, dancing and playing many instruments for over a century. I see myself as a generational product of that.

Growing up my mother played a lot of Whitney Houston in the car so I love Whitney's voice. "Who would Imagine a King" by Whitney was the first public solo I ever sang. I was 3 and it was in church. When I started playing mbira I listened to Chiwoniso Maraire - her voice and playing are definitions of beauty and excellence

Could you describe your most memorable concert experience?

Ah yes. It happened recently, with the Glee Club at Holy Cross Anglican Church in Soweto. It was magic and it was a dream come true. Unforgettable. I can still feel the energy from that night. 

What is your favorite music to play? And to listen to?

It depends on the mood. If Zimbabwe is on my mind (that's where I'm from) I listen to music I sang growing up - Vabvuwi, Oliver Mtukudzi, Thomas Mapfumo, traditional mbira music will probably be on my playlist If I feel like dancing it's going to be dancehall or a type of South African house music called kwaito (give it a listen, it's some yummy stuff). If I am looking for transcendent, meditational space it's going to be choral music. I have Tavener, Fauré and Johannes Eccard on that playlist amongst others and Gabriel sings on some of the recordings . 

I like to play my music the most (i.e. physically play). I'm a composer and composing is how I process my thoughts and emotions (which I have a LOT of). It can be mbira, piano or singing - whatever I need to process life. 

What are you working on at the moment?

Right now I am on a flight to Seattle to work with Chimurenga Renaissance, a hip hop group blending African music made up of two phenomenal musicians and MCs, Tendai "Baba" Maraire and Hussein Kolonji. 

Where would you like to be in 10 years' time?

Alive - if I'm still needed this side.

What do you enjoy doing most?

Living. 

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Could you give us a favorite memory?

I love Glee because it brings together the most eclectic bunch of people who just love to sing. I see that as a powerful lesson for living - that what binds us together can be beautiful, moving and impactful.

My favorite Glee Memory is the day I auditioned and got in. #GleekForLife! 

Website: http://www.tanyaradzwa.com

Alumni Spotlight on Tim Keeler '11

Conductor and countertenor Tim Keeler is new to the New York music scene but is already making waves. He performs regularly with the GRAMMY® nominated Choir of Trinity Wall Street, the St. Thomas Choir of Men and Boys, and Bach Vespers at Holy Trinity Lutheran. Next season will see him singing with the city’s most feted early music groups - New York Polyphony, TENET and Early Music New York. He holds degrees in music theory and conducting from Princeton, Cambridge, and the University of Michigan. His new venture, Trident Ensemble, has recently given an acclaimed debut performance in Manhattan, with a season of performances to follow at the Church of St Mary the Virgin, Times Square.
 

What inspired you to pursue a career in music?

I've always been intrigued by music as a career. I remember the day we had to decide on majors during my sophomore year. I waited until the very last second to decide between music and computer science. There were a few pieces on repeat on my ipod at the time that persuaded me to take the plunge: a Magnificat à 12 by Andrea Gabrieli, some canzonets by Thomas Morley, "Draw on sweet night" by John Wilbye, and Bach's motet Jesu, meine Freude. (I'm amazed at how quickly that list came back...) I realized I wouldn't be happy unless I had those things in my life. I suppose I could have majored in music and not pursued a career in music... let's be honest, that still might happen.

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

If I had to name someone - Gabriel Crouch is up there. (I promise I didn't get paid for this!) But seriously- a more talented, genuine, encouraging person you'll never meet. It's incredibly important to have someone in your corner. Gabriel has been that person for me.

But in general I'm influenced by anyone who performs with passion and purpose. I don't care what it is or who you are. If you're putting yourself out there, you deserve my respect. Because that's what I want to do.

Could you describe your most memorable concert experience?

Singing with the entire PUGC for a Christmas party at a three story apartment in Tribeca. Or when (name redacted) threw his score onto the stage at Richardson. Or when (another name redacted) punched one of the girls in the Yale Glee Club ON STAGE DURING THE FOOTBALL CONCERT.

Outside of Princeton? A performance of the Rachmaninoff vespers by candlelight in King's College chapel is up there...

What is your favorite music to play? And to listen to?

My favorite composer to sing is probably Byrd. To listen to? That's tough. Probably Bach. On the record player right now? Fleetwood Mac, Rumours. I am also an unashamed Taylor Swift fan. Though I think we all agree that To Pimp a Butterfly should win album of the year.

What are you working on at the moment?

I spent the majority of today looking through a late fifteenth century Spanish manuscript making an edition for a concert in February. One of the first pieces notated in quintuple meter. Check it out.

Where would you like to be in 10 years' time?

Oh boy. This is why it took me so long to answer these questions. Too much soul searching involved. In 10 years I hope that I'm still making good music with good people. It'd be nice to be teaching at a university or college by then. But who knows!

What do you enjoy doing most?

Well this one seems very open ended... I just bought a bike. Like, yesterday. And biking back to my apartment was one of the most liberating (read: enjoyable) feelings I've had in a while. Who cares if the subway isn't running!? I've got a bike!

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Could you give us a favorite memory?

My freshman year we performed Bach's B Minor mass and Jesu, meine Freude (see first question)I remember being completely blown away by the complexity and intensity of it all. I grew up around music, but this was all new to me. If Glee Club taught me anything, it was how much more I had to learn. That's a simultaneously exciting and daunting revelation. 

My favorite memory has got to be a PUGC performance of Bach's St. John Passion my senior year at the Nollner concert. The opening chorus is still one of the most intense, unrelenting compositions I've ever heard (da capo, are you KIDDING ME?... well that and the overture to Mendelssohn's Elijah... coincidence? no way). Performing that chorus I knew that I could never possibly learn everything I'd need to really understand it. I knew I'd never be a musician really deserving of that kind of work. But I also realized that that was ok: that wherever we are in our development, whatever we bring to the table, (as long as we're always trying to bring more)... it's ok! Your experience and the audience's experience is no less valid. 

Alumni Spotlight on Mimmi Fulmer '74

What inspired you to pursue a career in music?

I began taking piano lessons at age 4, and have never wanted to be anything but a musician ever since.  My life in music has taken on different aspects. I changed from an early immersion in piano to voice study in graduate school.  This was partly due to the encouragement and influence of Walter Nollner, Glee Club Director during my undergraduate studies at Princeton.

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

My early piano teachers were hugely influential in fostering a passion and commitment to practicing.  My life was completely changed when I arrived at Princeton, and discovered the world of musical thought centered there.  The incredible support and brilliance of James Randall, Milton Babbitt, Edward Cone, Arthur Mendel, Paul Lansky, Kenneth Levy, Lewis Lockwood, and Peter Westergaard transformed my ideas of what music was and what I might be capable of doing.  In addition, the experience of studying with legendary singers Bethany Beardslee and Jan DeGaetani inspired me to explore new music, and to try to bring some of their creative genius to my work.

Could you describe your most memorable concert experience?

My most memorable concert experience took place in the old Woolworth Music Building, in the somewhat dilapidated recital room.  I was premiering a piece written for me by graduate student Maura Bosch.  The text was from “The Changing Light at Sandover” by American poet James Merrill, and described a scene with him and David Jackson.  Both Merrill and Jackson were there, sitting in the front row, beaming their pleasure and interest.  It was the greatest privilege to sing Merrill’s transcendent words for him, and I was in a state of combined excitement and nerves.

What is your favorite music to play? And to listen to?

I love singing all music.  When I listen to music for pleasure, I tend to put on recordings of concertos, especially piano and violin.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am the editor of a three-volume anthology of Nordic songs, titled “Midnight Sun”, published by Subito Music.  This project, which includes songs from Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark, phonetics, translations, recordings of native speakers reciting the texts, and other information, has absorbed much of my time over the last five years.  My goal is to make Nordic songs more accessible to American singers.  As the grand-daughter of immigrants from Finland and Sweden, this anthology is my tribute to a legacy of beauty.

I am also writing a book about “Vision and Prayer” by Milton Babbitt.  This piece was the first to combine live vocal performance with synthesized tape accompaniment.  Premiered in 1961, it is an historic landmark.  My book will include a newly engraved and annotated score, notes from Bethany Beardslee about her work on the piece, coaching notes from Bethany, notes from Godfrey Winham, a copy of Babbitt’s unfinished piano-vocal version, and historical background.  As an annotated performer's guide and critical performance edition, it is meant to inspire and help singers learn and perform this iconic piece.

In terms of performance, I am currently singing concerts with the Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble, and am  preparing a teaching video of Nordic songs.

Where would you like to be in 10 years' time?

I would like to be running a semi-annual Nordic festival in Madison, and continuing my work on Nordic songs.  I love teaching, and plan to stay in my position as Professor of Voice and Opera at UW-Madison for years to come.

What do you enjoy doing most?

When I’m not absorbed in one musical project or another, I love to read, to cook, and most of all, spend time with my family, especially my new grandson. 

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Could you give us a favorite memory?

My time in the Glee Club was essential to guiding my interests in music.  I was in the second class of women at Princeton, and Walter Nollner was levitating with excitement to have women in the Glee Club.  He vigorously encouraged me to take voice lessons, and gave me many solos with the Glee Club. 

Among many wonderful memories, perhaps my favorite is when the Harvard Glee Club said they would not allow women from the Princeton Glee Club to sing the Harvard alma mater on their stage as part of the Football Concerts.  Walter consulted with the women in the Glee Club, and then replied to Harvard that it was all of us or none of us singing with the Harvard Glee Club.  The next time around, all of us did indeed sing the alma maters.  Change is brought about by both large and small actions, and Walter took a stand that changed things for the better.

Links: 
http://midnightsun.subitomusic.com/
http://www.music.wisc.edu/faculty/mimmi-fulmer/

Alumni Spotlight on Bob Peskin '78

What inspired you to pursue a career in music?

I always knew I’d be working in music, though it took me a long time to make the transition from avocation to vocation. My mother was a classical pianist, and I grew up in a home that was filled with music; I audited music classes at Princeton while still a high school student in town, and gained advance standing in the music department when I matriculated as a freshman. After college, I earned a living doing other things (radio broadcasting, college administration) for almost 15 years before enrolling in a master’s program in choral conducting, and I’ve never looked back.

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

My teachers, including those at Princeton and before, especially Bill Trego and Nancianne Parella, who were the conductor and accompanist, respectively, of both my high school choir and the Freshman Singers.
Dale Warland continues to inspire me, with his attention to detail and his relentless pursuit of artistic excellence. Similarly, Robert Shaw, whose recordings I grew up with, was a tremendous inspiration, especially his humility and his dedication to the composer and the music: making clear that our job as singers is to bring the music to life for the audience.

Could you describe your most memorable concert experience?

Before college: with my high school choir, singing the Duruflé Requiem with M. Duruflé conducting, and Mme. Duruflé at the organ. (Imagine my delight more than 20 years later and a thousand miles to the west, singing the same work with Robert Shaw, who explained to the performers that he was using tempi that were based on “a recording of an extraordinary American high school choir in a concert led by the composer”—the recording from my high school choir performance!)
In college: so many of the performances with the Nassoons—singing on tours for people who had never heard men’s voices in close harmony, and seeing the delight and revelation in their faces; at Reunions, especially for the older classes, who cherished their time together and who had experienced the bonds of fellowship that they could see mirrored in our (very) young faces.
Since college: singing the Rachmaninoff Vespers (“All-Night Vigil”) with the Dale Warland Singers, the night that the Columbia space shuttle disintegrated on re-entry. The concert was dedicated to the memory of the astronauts who had died that day. It’s a profoundly emotional work in any context, but singing it that night was deeply moving.

What is your favorite music to play? And to listen to?

My tastes are very broad—as much as I’m immersed in classical music, I love jazz, rock, and folk music. I also sing in a doo-wop quartet, which keeps me connected to the popular music of the ‘50s and ‘60s.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m in the Minnesota Beethoven Festival Chorale, a pick-up group of professional singers led by Dale Warland. We spend a week in rehearsal, and present a pair of concerts at the end of the week. This year, the centerpiece of the concert is Dominick Argento’s “Walden Pond.” I sang the premiere as a member of the Dale Warland Singers 20 years ago, and it’s one of those works that you get more out of each time you sing it.

Where would you like to be in 10 years' time?

Still singing, I hope!

What do you enjoy doing most?

Other than singing? Spending time with family & friends, reading/learning, travel.

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Could you give us a favorite memory?

I opted to join the Freshman Singers instead of the Glee Club, so that I could continue singing with my mentor, Bill Trego. At the same time, Glee Club conductor Walter Nollner invited me to sing on the GC’s intersession tour to Jamaica. Singing for two conductors at the same time was a valuable experience, and proved to be both instructive and a foreshadowing of my career as a professional choral singer.
Favorite GC memory: intersession tour to Jamaica in January, 1975. We sang at a reception for the country’s prime minister and the top government officials.
Favorite Freshman Singers memory: spring tour to Colonial Williamsburg, and singing by candlelight in Bruton Parish Church.

Links:
http://www.mnchorale.org/
http://www.fabulousfairlanes.com/
http://www.mnbeethovenfestival.org/dale-warland-and-festival-chorale-2/

Alumni Spotlight on Ryan Brandau '03

What inspired you to pursue a career in music?

Many different things, I think. I was fortunate to grow up in a musical family, so I sat at the piano bench with my grandmother and with my father as a little kid. I was also fortunate to grow up in a public school district that supported music, so I was able to sing in ensembles, perform in musicals, and play a bunch of different instruments in the orchestra and band. In high school I joined two youth symphonies and, with my father, the chorus for the regional Symphony. When I arrived at Princeton and started taking courses in the music department, I fell in love with music theory and musicology. Upon graduation, I went off to Cambridge in the UK thinking I’d do musicology, but, while there, I sang nearly every day of the week. That daily interface with high level music making sealed the deal for me. I knew I had to be a conductor. 

Who are the greatest influences on you as a musician?

As corny as it sounds, the greatest influences on me as a musician have been the composers themselves. I love the sense that they had something particular to say through music, wrote it down in a score, and left it for us to bring back to life. I love that feeling of discovery through mediation. With so many pieces, all we have are the lines and dots of ink on the page, but of course the music we create is so much more than that. 

Could you describe your most memorable concert experience?

I’ve loved so many concert experiences that it’s impossible to pick! As for Princeton, I’ll never forget the Katzenjammers’ concert (“jam”) in the fall of 2001 at Richardson, for which I was music director. It was one of my first major experiences as a conductor. My heart was filled with pride for all that the singers and I had accomplished together, musically, and warm with the joy of deep friendship. It was so palpable, that feeling of “yeah, this is what it’s all about."

What is your favorite music to play? And to listen to?

I absolutely love to sing Renaissance polyphony. The natural singability, beautiful rhetorical shape, and sense of dialogue in the polyphonic lines beautifully represent the communicative essence of choral music. 

What are you working on at the moment?

I’ve had a fabulously full plate this season. I just finished a program of music by Dallapiccola, Josquin, Clemens non Papa, and Lassus. In a few days I’ll conduct Rachmaninoff’s All-Night Vigil. Later this month, I’ll conduct a concert that combines Mozart’s Solemn Vespers with selections from Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610. At this very moment, I’ve got orchestra parts strewn all over my dining room table... 

Where would you like to be in 10 years' time?

Each year, I have the opportunity to explore deeply a group of choral-orchestral masterworks. In some cases, I’m performing them (as a conductor) for the first time. In other cases, when I’m coming back to something, I find new resonances and layers of meaning in the work. I look forward to the breadth and depth that ten years will afford. I also hope, in the next couple of years, to make time for more writing, composing, and arranging, to get on the other side of the musical score, as it were. 

What do you enjoy doing most?

Making music with others. I really do love my job. I get to share beautiful music with hundreds of people each week. When I’m not working, I absolutely love to cook and to bust a gut laughing with my friends.  

What did your time in the Glee Club teach you? Could you give us a favorite memory?

Thanks to Richard Tang Yuk, who was the director during my time in the Glee Club, I learned a huge amount of major repertoire. Bach, Brahms, Beethoven, Mahler, Duruflé, Mendelssohn, Haydn, Vaughan Williams, Palestrina, Byrd, Tallis, and on and on and on. Repeatedly, I got to experience the way that the great choral-orchestral masterworks can completely, ravishingly overwhelm you.